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humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?"
"When I got locked up, for dealing drugs. Actually— I take that back. The saddest moment was when I took my five year old daughter to the doctor and found out she needed glasses. She put on those glasses, and she said: ‘Daddy! Daddy! I can see! I can see!’ Tears just started streaming down my face. What a fucking idiot I’d been. We’d take drives to the Catskills, and we’d point out deer to her, and she’d never seem to see them. She’d always say ‘Where!? Where!?’ It should have been obvious. I spent five years trying to give her everything I could, and I messed up the most important thing.’"

humansofnewyork:

"I remember sitting at my grandfather’s feet when I was eight or nine years old, while he sat in an old chair and read the New York Times. He tried to explain the creation of Israel, and the situation in the Middle East. And even though he was a rabbi and a holocaust survivor, he explained the viewpoints of everyone involved in the conflict. Then told me to decide for myself."

humansofnewyork:

"When you’re 25, you feel like you’re riding a wave. You feel like opportunities are just going to keep coming to you, and you think it’s never going to end. But then it ends."
"When does it end?"
"When you turn 40, and they start looking for someone younger."

humansofnewyork:

"We’re on the way to a singing lesson right now. I tell him: ‘Anything you want to do, we do. Anything you want to quit, we quit.’"

humansofnewyork:

"What do you feel most guilty about?"
"Not being as happy as I should be."

humansofnewyork:

"Before I entered seminary, I fell in love with God. A few months into seminary, I fell in love with philosophy. Two years into seminary, I fell in love with a girl."

humansofnewyork:

"It takes much more than being physically present. Your family needs your attention. I realized this very young. One day I asked my wife why the children weren’t listening to me, and she said: ‘Because you never listen to them.’"

humansofnewyork:

"We’re getting divorced because we love each other, and we both realize that we don’t have enough of what the other needs. When we decided to get divorced, I wrote a note with all the things I loved about her, and gave it to her. She got very emotional and started crying. Then three days later, she wrote me a similar note. But here’s the thing—- she wrote it on the back of a recycled piece of paper. She wrote it on the back of an advertisement or something. So I called her out on it. And she said: ‘I knew you were going to bring that up. If you cared, you wouldn’t mind what it was written on.’ And I said: ‘Well, if you cared, you’d have gotten a fresh piece of paper.’"

humansofnewyork:

"My family made me come. But I hate it. I can’t get a job because I have a lot of accent. I was an assistant manager at a big jewelry store in the Dominican Republic, now I clean tables. We had a big house there. Now we live in a small apartment. If I was home right now, I’d be in a very nice restaurant, on the beach, laughing with my friends. Not sitting alone on a bench, trying to learn English. There I was a princess. Here I am an immigrant. A servant."

humansofnewyork:

"Even if we work hard to be a teacher, or a lawyer, or a doctor, we are seen first as outsiders."

humansofnewyork:

"What’s your best quality?"
"My body."

humansofnewyork:

"I found him in the trash. I named him Shadow because he followed me everywhere."

humansofnewyork:

"She got pregnant with another man, then asked me to be the godfather."

humansofnewyork:

"What was the happiest moment of your life?"
"When I turned 30."
"Why’s that?" 
"I just felt like I’d made it through the crap."

humansofnewyork:

"We were twenty-five and twenty-eight, but we acted like fifteen year olds. Fighting over little things, storming off, breaking up for a week and then getting back together. But developmentally, we were fifteen year olds. We’d been in the closet our whole lives, so we didn’t have any practice with relationships. He still hadn’t come out to his family and a lot of his friends. We were on one of our ‘little breaks’ when he died suddenly from a seizure. And nobody in his family or circle knew I existed. It took me four months to find out that he died. I thought he’d just decided never to talk to me again. His family never found out about me. Or him, for that matter."